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**Regional Science Fair 2/19/2020**

Paperwork due 1/23/2020

Weekly Lesson Plan

Weekly Lesson Plan

Week of: 01/27/2020

Class: General Science 6th

Periods: 4&5

Instructor: Tim Biggers

Ecosystems and Biomes: Lesson 3: “Aquatic Ecosystems”. Chapter 6, pp. 310-313

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Lesson Objectives:

  • Students will be able to describe two major types of aquatic ecosystemsfound on Earth.
  • Students will be able to explain and describe the differences between various aquatic life zones.
  • Students will be able to describe what two major categories aquatic ecosystemsare divided into.
  • ____________________________________________________________

    Colorado State Standards:

    Life Science 2.6.b, 2.9.d:Students know and understand the characteristics and structure of living things, the processes of life and how living things interact with each other and their environment.

    6.2.2.a: Develop, communicate, and justify an evidence-based explanation about why there generally are more producers than consumers in an ecosystem. (DOK 1-3)

    6.2.2.b: Design a food web diagram to show the flow of energy through an ecosystem. (DOK 1-2)

    6.2.2.c: Compare and contrast the flow of energy with the cycling of matter in ecosystems. (DOK 2)

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    Materials Needed:

    Text book, notebook, Purple 6th grade science folder, #2 pencil with eraser or mechanical pencil, lab materials as needed per various labs/activities. Models/materials as donated, supplied, or on loan from CSU-Pueblo Life Sciences Dept.

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    Engagement (Bell Ringer)

    Day 1: Describe what the term aquatic refers to.

    Day 2: Why is sunlight important to aquatic ecosystems?

    Day 3: What are two groups of freshwater ecosystems?

    Day 4: Why are certain organisms important to marine ecosystems?

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    Differentiation strategies to meet diverse learner needs:

    Teaching strategies for this unit will include instructional lecture, visual & audio aid/presentations, realistic models, and kinesthetic labs and activities to reinforce subject content comprehension.

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    DOL/Checking to Assess Mastery: Activate prior knowledge:

    • I will explain that the word intertidal combines a form of the word tide with a prefix (inter-) meaning “between.” The intertidal zone of the ocean is the area between the water line at high tide and at low tide.

    Lesson enhancement: Students will compare and contrast types of aquatic ecosystems. Ask: What are two examples of flowing water ecosystems? How do these ecosystems differ? What are two examples of standing water ecosystems? How do these ecosystems differ?

    Evaluation: Have the students take the Lesson Quiz

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    Main Ideas:

  • I will explain to students that water-based ecosystems are called aquatic ecosystems. I will ask: What two major categories are aquatic ecosystems divided into?
  • The source of most freshwater on earth is in glaciers and in water underground. In fact, 99% of liquid freshwater is found underground. Almost ½ of the world’s lake water is saltwater, such as the great salt lake of Utah. Saltwater lakes can be up to ten times saltier than the ocean. I will point out that sunlight, temperature, oxygen, and salt content are factors that affect all aquatic ecosystems.
  • I’ll ask: Why is sunlight important to aquatic ecosystems?
  • Where does most photosynthesis take place?
  • What are two types of freshwater ecosystems?
  • Weekly progress check: On Thursday, to include weekly comprehension, vocabulary and terminology, and a section assessment to determine content mastery and understanding.

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    Homework Assignment and Assessments:

  • Read Chapter 6 pp. 310-313.
  • Outline the chapter section if necessary.
  • Complete chapter review worksheet (in class if possible)
  • Write vocabulary words and terms to prepare for weekly vocabulary and terminology assessment.
  • Participate in class lectures, video presentations and discussions.
  • Participate in class labs/activities.
  • ____________________________________________________________

    Weekly vocabulary: Students will be given a weekly vocabulary assessment to enhance unit/lesson comprehension.

  • Aquatic
  • Ecosystem
  • Estuary
  • Intertidal zone
  • Neritic zone
  • Fresh water
  • Salt water
  • Continental shelf
  • Continental slope
  • High tide
  • Low tide
  • Surface zone
  • Deep zone
  • Open ocean
  • ____________________________________________________________

    Notes/Reflections on the lesson: Lesson plans may be altered/revised due to Athletic events or other school activities. 

    Weekly Lesson Plan

    Weekly Lesson Plan

    Week of: 01/27/2020

    Class: General Science 7th

    Period: 1

    Instructor: Tim Biggers

    Life science: Chapter 3 Section 4 "The Cell in Its Environment" pp. 190-195.

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    Lesson Objectives:

  • Students will be able to describe how materials move into and out of cells
  • Students will be able to describe the process of osmosis.
  • ____________________________________________________________

    Colorado State Standards:

    Life Science 2.6.b, 2.9.dStudents know and understand the characteristics and structure of living things, the processes of life and how living things interact with each other and their environment.

    2.6.b Students can: Analyze and interpret data on homeostatic mechanisms using direct and indirect evidence to develop and support claims about the effectiveness of feedback loops to maintain homeostasis.

    7.2.3.a Students can: Gather, analyze, and interpret data and models on the different types of cells, their structures, components and functions. (DOK 1-2)

    7.2.3.b Students can: Develop, communicate, and justify an evidence-based scientific explanation regarding cell structures, components, and their specific functions. (DOK 1-3)

    7.2.3.c Students can: Compare and contrast the basic structures and functions of plant cells, animal cells, and single celled organisms. (DOK 2)

    7.2.3.d Students can: Employ tools to gather, view, analyze, and report results for the scientific investigations of cells. (DOK 1-2)

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    Materials Needed:

    Biology text book, notebook, green Biology folder, #2 pencil with eraser or mechanical pencil, lab materials as needed per various labs/activities. Models/materials as donated, supplied, or on loan from CSU-Pueblo Life Sciences Dept.

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    Engagement (Bell Ringer):

    Day 1: What will a cell need more of, if it gets bigger?

    Day 2: What would put upper limits on the size of a cell?

    Day 3: Why does oxygen always diffuse into an animal cell?

    Day 4: What might happen if a cell was caught in an environment of its own wastes?

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    Differentiation strategies to meet diverse learner needs:

    Teaching strategies for this unit will include instructional lecture, visual & audio aid/presentations, realistic models, and kinesthetic labs and activities to reinforce subject content comprehension.

    ____________________________________________________________

    DOL/Checking to Assess Mastery:

    Activate prior knowledge: Students may be confused about the difference between diffusion and osmosis. Emphasize that although they are both forms of passive transport, diffusion is the movement of any molecules from an area of high concentration to an area of low concentration, while osmosis refers only to the diffusion of water across a membrane.

    Lesson enhancement/Lab Activity: Cell Membrane Function:

    • Materials: Glass jar, marbles, water, strainer or colander, large bowl or plastic basin.
    • Time: 5 minutes
    • Show students a jar containing some marbles and water, then pour the contents into a strainer.
    • Ask: What happened when I poured the contents of the jar into the strainer?
    • What does the strainer represent in the cell?

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    Main Ideas: How do Materials move into and out of cells?

    • Cells have structures that protect their contents from the world outside the cell. To live and function, however cells must let certain materials enter and leave. Oxygen and water and particles of food must be able to move into a cell, while carbon dioxide and other waste materials must move out. Much as a gatekeeper controls the flow of traffic into and out of a parking lot, the cell membrane controls how materials move into or out of a cell.

    Weekly progress check: On Thursday, to include weekly comprehension, vocabulary and terminology, and a section assessment to determine content mastery and understanding.

    ____________________________________________________________

    Homework Assignment and Assessments:

  • Read Chapter 3 pp. 190-195.
  • Outline the chapter section if necessary.
  • Complete chapter review worksheet (in class if possible)
  • Write vocabulary words and terms to prepare for weekly vocabulary and terminology assessment.
  • Participate in class lectures, video presentations and discussions.
  • Participate in class labs/activities.
  • ____________________________________________________________

    Weekly vocabulary: Students will be given a weekly vocabulary assessment to enhance unit comprehension.

  • Selectively permeable
  • Passive transport
  • Diffusion
  • Osmosis
  • Active transport
  • Endocytosis
  • Exocytosis
  • Cell membrane
  • Food vacuole
  • ____________________________________________________________

    Notes/Reflections on the lesson: Lesson plans may be altered due to Athletic events or other school activities.____________________________________

    Weekly Lesson Plan

    Week of: 01/27/2020

    Class: 8th Science

    Period: 3

    Instructor: Tim Biggers

    Chapter 1 “Forces” Unit 3 “Momentum”

    pp. 110-113

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    Lesson Objectives:

  • Students will be able to explain how momentum is determined and conserved.
  • Students will be able to calculate the momentum of a moving object.
  • Students will be able to explain how increasing force affects momentum.
  • ____________________________________________________________

    Colorado State Standards: Physical Science 1.2.c

    Students know and understand common properties, forms, and changes in matter and energy.

    8.1.1.a Predict and evaluate the movement of an object by examining the forces applied to it (DOK 1-2)

    8.1.1.b Use mathematical expressions to describe the movement of an object. (DOK 1-2)

    8.1.1.c Develop and design a scientific investigation to collect and analyze speed and acceleration data to determine the net forces acting on a moving object. (DOK 2-4)

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    Materials Needed: Notebook, Blue Science folder, #2 pencil with eraser or mechanical pencil, lab materials as needed per various labs/activities.

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    Engagement (Bell Ringer)

    Day 1: What is an object’s momentum?

    Day 2: What two objects collide when an air hockey player bounces a puck off of the wall?

    Day 3: How does the speed of the puck affect its movement after the collision?

    Day 4: What can you do to increase the velocity of an object?

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    Differentiation strategies to meet diverse learner needs:

    Teaching strategies for this unit will include instructional lecture, visual & audio aid/presentations, realistic models, and kinesthetic labs and activities to reinforce subject content comprehension.

    ____________________________________________________________

    DOL/Checking to Assess Mastery:

    Activate prior knowledge: Momentum in Open and Closed Systems. When the law of conservation of momentum is discussed in the text, the objects are assumed to be part of a closed system. In a closed system, the only forces considered are those exerted by the objects themselves. Objects in a closed system are not acted upon by outside forces. The total energy in a closed system remains constant. In a closed system, if one object gains momentum, another object must lose momentum so that the total momentum within the system remains constant.

    In real life however, systems are open. In an open system, forces such as friction and gravity act on objects, affecting their motion and momentum.

    Students will be given random progress check assessments during the study of this unit.

    Students will complete a unit review assessment at the completion of sections to determine content comprehension.

    Students will be assessed on the vocabulary and terms discussed in this section.

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    Lesson/Activity:

    Main Ideas: What is an Object’s Momentum? Is it harder to stop a rolling bowling ball or a rolling marble? Does your answer depend on the velocities of the objects? All moving objects have what Newton called a “quantity of motion.” Today it is called momentum. Momentum is a characteristic of a moving object that is related to the mass and velocity of the object.

  • I will teach key concepts by explaining how to calculate momentum. I will use the Support the Big Q to illustrate that momentum depends on an object’s mass and velocity. I will then have the students practice the inquiry skill in the Apply it activity. I will continue to teach key concepts by asking students to describe an example of conservation of momentum.
  • I will teach this lesson using a variety of resources. I will begin by having students share ideas about a puck’s movement in a game of air hockey.
  • Weekly progress check: On Thursday, to include weekly comprehension, vocabulary and terminology, and a section assessment to determine content mastery and understanding.

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    Homework Assignment and Assessments:

    (Sections will be presented and discussed in order)

  • Outline the chapter section if necessary.
  • Read chapter 1 unit 3 pp. 110-113.
  • Complete chapter review worksheet (in class if possible)
  • Write vocabulary words and terms to prepare for weekly vocabulary and terminology assessment.
  • Participate in class lectures, video presentations and discussions.
  • Participate in class labs/activities.
  • ____________________________________________________________

    Weekly vocabulary: Students will be given a weekly vocabulary assessment to enhance unit comprehension.

    • Momentum
    • Law of conservation of momentum
    • Mass
    • Force
    • Outside force
    • Collision
    • Collision force
    • Calculate
    • Velocity
    • Meter
    • Interact

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    Notes/Reflections on the lesson: Lesson plans may be altered due to Athletic events or other school activities.